High Five! Using Social Medial to Mobilize Your Fan Base

I was hanging out with my daughter tonight and she told me a story about a person in her class who tweeted about how much he loves Burger King.   Later in the day, the guy tapped her on the shoulder and told her that his tweet got re-tweeted by, wait for it, Burger King!   How cool is that? 

While I thought it was pretty cool, my daughter’s friend thought it was incredible.  And while he doesn’t have a lot of followers on Twitter, he does have a lot of friends in the “real world,” and he also has a lot of friends on Facebook.  So, next time they’re faced with the choice of McDonald’s or Burger King, guess where they’ll go for lunch?

The above is one example of how social media provides a never-before-seen opportunity for brands to directly connect with, and mobilize, their fan base, one person at a time.  Effective use of social media isn’t simply using it for damage control (@comcastCares, for example), or for promoting your company’s latest deals (that becomes noise pretty fast).  Effective use of social media is about finding opportunities to give those in your fan base a very public, and personal, high five whenever they mention you.

That’s exciting for no less of a reason than this:  The love your fans have for your brand becomes validated.  Suddenly, where there once was a transactional connection between customer and company, there is now a personal connection between two people.  As impersonal as social media platforms can be, they are irrisistable because they allow us to cut through the marketing and PR, and get down to a fundamental truth that human life, regardless of culture, is really about conversations.  The benefit of tapping into this basic truth is that your brand will build personal, high value relationships with your most loyal fan base, and that fan base will grow your company.  It really is that easy.

So, your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to give one of your fans a very public high five.  They will reward you for it greatly.

Thanks for reading.  Oh, and if you feel like it, leave a comment.

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  • http://blog.michaelleis.com Michael

    Nice post, Pat. It’s easily overlooked how powerful the simple act of recognition can be in social media: not only within the teen “shout-out for a shout-out” culture on Twitter, but also for humanizing the brand. From the brand’s perspective, these simple acts go a long way towards very real business elements like mitigating future risk, and frankly a more effective return than, say, display, when done right.

    • Pat Perdue

      Thanks Michael. And nicely put: “Shout-out for a shout-out culture,” defines Twitter well. Thanks again for reading.

    • Anonymous

      Thanks Michael. Great point how the simple “shout outs” can be more effective than display advertising. So true – particularly because their searchable! Thank you again!